Lebanese photographer Omar Reda recently traveled to the Omo Valley in Southern Ethiopia to capture three different tribes, the Dassanech, the Mursi and the Hamar on film.

His colorful images reveal showcase the unique cultural identity of each tribe. along with the magnificent and fascinating decorative styles worn by its people, such as the Mursi’s famed lip-plates.

Instagram@omarreda

Reda told the U.K.'s MailOnline Travel that he was especially grateful for being welcomed by each tribe, and visited in order to showcase the "beautiful diversity of cultures on Earth."

He explained, "These tribes still maintain their traditions and culture. One example, the lip plate of the Mursi tribe started during the colonisation and slavery era where women started to pinch their lips and deform it in order to be avoided to be taken as a slave.

Instagram@omarreda

"With time, this tradition changed and the lip plate became a sign of beauty. The bigger the plate the more beautiful the girl is. Another example, they told me that the Hamar tribe women are not allowed to take a shower for good after marriage."

Instagram@omarreda

The heavy lip plates of the Mursi are considered to enhance beauty and are made of clay. Often as big as five inches in diameter, they're used to mark traditional rites of passage for women of the Mursi tribe. Some women can eat with the plates still in while others take them out to enjoy their meals.

The Mursi also don headdresses, fruit, horns, underskin tattoos, gunshell necklaces and hardware headhangers.

Instagram@omarreda

The Hamar tribe are known for covering their hair and body with clay, butter, animal fat and wearing ochre make-up.

Instagram@omarreda

The Dassanech tribe is made up of eight clans. The beads are the symbol of each clan. They often wear highly prized recycled bottle tops, which have become their signature look.

View more of Reda's talented works on Instagram @omarreda.

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