A group of “guerrilla gardeners” from all over the world are using a creative way to draw attention to streets and roads that have neglected potholes by transforming them into gorgeous, miniature gardens. It’s a clever and subtle approach to a problem that usually takes forever to get fixed.

To create the protest art, the gardeners first fill the potholes with soil and then plant colorful flowers like violets and daffodils. The results are roads that are much more aesthetically pleasing. The flowers look so out of place in the tarmac that they instantly draw the eye of pedestrians, drivers, and hopefully city officials who can get them fixed.

Pothole flowers have been spotted in cities across the globe, from London to Chicago. Some people have criticized the trend, saying the colorful flowers are a distraction that could be dangerous to drivers. But unfilled potholes are a more serious danger to cyclists and drivers. Plus, pothole flowers aren’t permanent, but they make a lasting impression in the short time they exist.

Pothole flowers are a subtle form of protest art.

Paige Breithart

Mt Hood Summer Ski Camp

Paige Breithart

Paige Breithart

They enhance the landscape while drawing attention to unfilled cracks and potholes.

Paige Breithart

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Paige Breithart

Paige Breithart

The flowers don’t last very long, but the guerrilla gardeners say it’s the message that matters.

Paige Breithart

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